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Maidstone, ME16 8SL
United Kingdom

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©2016 by Burrows & Brooks Tea Co.

Green teas are delicately processed, and need to be treated with slightly more attention than black teas.

 

The main point to remember is that if you pour boiling water onto any green tea leaf, it will scald the leaf and cause it to taste bitter and astringent on the palate. This is the number one reason why many people dislike green tea: they are likely to have had a badly brewed green tea at some point in their lives, and from that one experience decided that they ‘don’t like’ green tea.

 

In fact, green teas have such a variety of flavour and character, that they should not taste bitter at all, if correctly brewed.

 

The golden rule is you must not use water that is heated over 80°C. If you stick to this rule, your green tea should taste smooth and satisfying on the taste buds.

 

There are two efficient and easy ways to get your water to the required temperature:

 

The first method is to use a temperature-controlled kettle. These are readily available, and a really good investment if you like any tea other than black.

 

The second method is to pop just under one-third cold water into your cup or pot, to cover your loose leaf tea or tea bag, then you can pour freshly boiled water on top. This will give you an approximate temperature of between 70-80°C. This method is a quick go-to for brewing, and although not perfect is a swift solution if you’re not too precious.

 

Green teas should be drunk without milk or sugar, except in certain cases. Matcha green tea, for instance, can be drunk with hot milk.

 

Our Casablanca blend tastes delicious brewed at 90°C and one or two spoonfuls of brown sugar, in the style of a Moroccan mint tea.

In the majority of circumstances though, the best method of brewing green tea is:

 

Heat freshly drawn water to 80°C, brew for 3 minutes, drink without milk or sugar.

Fun fact: In the early 17th century when tea was first becoming popular with the British aristocracy, it was Chinese green tea that was being imported, and not what we consider the ‘traditional’ black tea of modern times. It was the fashion to take sugar with green tea, both being expensive commodities, and the relaxing pastime of drinking tea was viewed as a stylish and modish treat!